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The humanitarian and developmental impacts of anti-vehicle mines

Improvised explosive device containing an anti-tank mine found by Iraqi police in Baghdad, 2005
Improvised explosive device containing an anti-tank mine (centre) found by Iraqi police in Baghdad, 2005. Image credit: US military

Since 2013, SIPRI and the Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining (GICHD) have partnered to assess the humanitarian and development impacts of anti-vehicle mines (ANMs). Using information reported by states, mine action organizations and international media outlets, SIPRI and GICHD have been able to monitor and map AVM incidents to allow policymakers to visualize the data on an interactive map. The AVM Casualty Map presents incidents by geographic location and provides casualty data at the international and national levels as well as incident-specific information, where available.

The project represents a first step towards developing a long-range data series on the humanitarian and development impacts of AVMs and has generated two publications (a study on the humanitarian and development impacts of anti-vehicle mines, and the 2015 study) outlining key findings and trend analysis. Further extensions of the project will refine reporting indicators and data collection techniques, enabling more historical coverage and new levels of disaggregation of casualty and incident data.

Research staff

Dr Rachel Irwin was a Senior Researcher in the SIPRI Security and Development Programme.
Emma Bjertén-Günther is a Researcher within the SIPRI Security and Development Programme.
Kate Sullivan is the Programme Coordinator for the Security and Development Programme.