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Session reports

Click here to download ‘Reflections on the 2019 Forum on Peace and Development’. 

Click here to download the complete compendium of session reports.

See below for links to individual session reports.

 

14 May 11.15–12.45

DOES PEACEKEEPING WORK? KEY FINDINGS FROM RECENT RESEARCH IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO AND MALI

Institutional lead: Epon Network and Challenges Forum

Description: A number of instruments are employed by the international community to prevent and manage conflicts, to reduce fragility and to sustain peace. Among these, a peace operation is one of the instruments that has the greatest potential to enhance the implementation of the SDGs in fragile and conflict-affected states. But do peace operations work?

 

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SECURITY IMPLICATIONS OF MEGATRENDS IN AFRICA

Institutional lead: Africa Center for Strategic Studies

Description: This panel analysed the security implications of megatrends that characterize Africa’s peace and security landscape, including migration, demographic transition, urbanization and climate variability. Data and research on megatrends provide some indication of what Africa’s security landscape will look like in the coming years. 

 

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FOOD ASSISTANCE AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO IMPROVING PROSPECTS FOR PEACE

Institutional lead: World Food Programme

Description: Today, an estimated 2 billion people live in fragile and conflict-affected areas of the world, where they are extremely vulnerable to the impact of conflicts and disasters. The session presented some of the preliminary findings of the knowledge partnership between SIPRI and WFP and discussed overall linkages between food assistance interventions and possible contributions to peace.

 

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NEGLECTED, IMMEASURABLE AND HYPERCOMPLICATED: IS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOAL 16 FOR PEACEFUL AND INCLUSIVE SOCIETIES DOOMED TO FAIL?

Institutional lead: Center on International Cooperation

Description: Armed conflict, violence, corruption and organized crime are major threats to sustainable development. At the same time SDG 16 is very broad, is difficult to implement and measure, and there is resistance from some regarding SDG 16 as challenging the sovereignty of states. Is SDG 16 doomed to fail or are there opportunities for success?

 

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HOW TO REALIZE THE SECURITY-DEVELOPMENT NEXUS?

Institutional lead: The Brookings Institution

Description: Corruption is the abuse of power, position or trust for private gain. It is present in all countries but Scholars and practitioners have acknowledged a security–development nexus for over 25 years, and yet there are few examples of operations that successfully navigated the challenges posed by this nexus. 

 

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14 May 14.15–15.45

INTEGRATING CLIMATE-RELATED SECURITY RISKS: ENHANCING THE MOMENTUM IN THE UNITED NATIONS

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: In recent years, the discussion of the United Nations’ role and the UN Security Council’s ability in addressing and responding to climate-related security risks has intensified. In recent years, the discussion of the United Nations’ role and the UN Security Council’s ability in addressing and responding to climate-related security risks has intensified. 

 

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INCLUSIVE PEACE AGREEMENT IMPLEMENTATION

Institutional lead: UNDP Oslo Governance Centre

Description: The panel will critically reflect on the opportunities and obstacles presented by peace agreement implementation processes, and under which conditions inclusive arrangements can help to support the establishment of pathways to peaceful, just and inclusive societies.

 

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DIALOGUE IN ACTION: A CANDID CONVERSATION ON DELIVERING TOGETHER

Institutional lead: International Dialogue on Peacebuilding and Statebuilding

Description: The International Dialogue on Peacebuilding and Security (IDPS) brings together countries affected by conflict and fragility, development partners and civil society to build sustainable peace and development. This session reflected on the experiences of the IDPS and its relevance for the World Bank, UN and bilateral cooperation, and identified opportunities for delivering together in crisis response and long-term peacebuilding.

 

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TOWARDS A NORMATIVE FRAMEWORK FOR INCLUSIVE AND EFFECTIVE PEACE PROCESSES

Institutional lead: Interpeace

Description: To design and implement peace processes that can successfully address the underlying root causes of violence and make peace more sustainable, the way the international system approaches peace processes needs to fundamentally change. The panel discussed the need for new mechanisms, practices and norms in peacebuilding and peace processes and showcased examples of how this can work in practice.

 

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CAN MEDIATION DE-ESCALATE CONFLICTS IN CYBERSPACE?

Institutional lead: Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue

Description: Conflicts in cyberspace—from intrusions into critical infrastructure to the manipulation of social media to interfere in elections—have so far not proved amenable to the traditional tools of conflict resolution. This session examined existing diplomatic efforts to promote the stability of cyberspace and considered in what circumstances mediation may help.

 

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15 May 9.00–11.00

SHORING UP STABILITY IN THE LAKE CHAD REGION: ADDRESSING CLIMATE AND FRAGILITY RISKS

Institutional lead: Adelphi

Description: The session will be the official launch of the report Shoring up Stability in the Lake Chad Region: Addressing Climate and Fragility Risks.

 

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CORRUPTION AND PEACEBUILDING

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: Corruption is the abuse of power, position or trust for private gain. It is present in all countries but especially prevalent in conflict-affected and fragile states. Participants will discuss experiences and challenges of and lessons learned from mitigating corruption risks in stabilization and peacebuilding environments.

 

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MANAGING SECURITY AND PROMOTING STABILITY IN  THE HORN OF AFRICA AND RED SEA

Institutional lead: Crisis Management Initiative; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This session will seek to Identify the key security threats that intersect in the Horn of Africa and Red Sea area; explore the emerging role of local, regional and international security actors in the region; and consider how existing regional institutions can be adapted and new arrangements developed to better manage the security challenges of the region. 

 

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WHAT NEXT ON THE PATH FOR ACCOUNTABILITY FOR ABUSES INCLUDING SEXUAL AND GENDER-BASED VIOLENCE IN RAKHINE STATE?

Institutional lead: Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue

Description: The pursuit of accountability following the military operations in Rakhine state in 2017 has triggered both international and locally grown truth- and justice-seeking mechanisms. The session will explore what these new dynamics mean for accountability and efforts towards eventual reconciliation in Rakhine State.

 

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PREVENTING AN UNJUST PEACE: HOUSING, LAND AND PROPERTY RIGHTS IN SYRIA AND THE RISK OF PREMATURE PEACEBUILDING

Institutional lead: International Legal Assistance Consortium

Description: Syria is at a crossroads, and with that comes a heightened risk of premature peacebuilding. It is time for a more informed dialogue on guaranteeing the security and well-being of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees who want to return to their homes and reclaim their property in any potential reconstruction process.

 

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EVIDENCE–BASED APPROACHES TO THE SECURITY–DEVELOPMENT NEXUS

Institutional lead: The Brookings Institute

Description: Scholars and practitioners have acknowledged a security–development nexus for over 25 years, but there is a divide between each community. Even within academia and the implementer community, the security, development and humanitarian subfields are in their own silos. This session focused on creating a better understand of each of these divides and brainstorming how they can be bridged to create better, evidence-based approaches in the security–development nexus.

 

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IS PEACEMAKING TOO IMPORTANT TO BE LEFT IN THE HANDS OF PEACEMAKERS?

Institutional lead: European Institute of Peace

Description: At the 2019 Stockholm Forum, the European Institute of Peace (EIP) will explore with representatives of the private sector how peacemakers might work constructively with both local and international private sector actors to support their work and contribute to achieving a sustainable peace.

 

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HUMAN RIGHTS, PEACEBUILDING AND SDG16.1: BREAKING SILOS AND BUILDING BRIDGES

Institutional lead: Pathfinders for Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies

Description: This session explores the essential connections between peacebuilding, violence prevention and human rights, and elaborates how the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provide an essential framework for action. The session will reveal key areas of convergence but also existing gaps across communities.

 

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15 May 11.30–13.30

GENDERED DIMENSIONS OF CONFLICT AND GENDERED RESPONSES

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This session examines the role of gender norms and gender inequalities in driving conflict and violence, as well as the gendered impact of conflict. Using a number of case studies, it will explore how peacebuilding and development at the local and national levels can, and should, address gender norms, tackle gender inequalities and be inclusive.

 

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HOW CAN WE IMPROVE GOOD GOVERNANCE IN THE MIDST OF WAR?

Institutional lead: Mercy Corps

Description: This session explores how to build positive governance capacity in complex contexts where institutions may have collapsed or were a party to the war, as well as how to strengthen actors and systems in insecure environments.

 

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IMPLEMENTING THE HUMANITARIAN–DEVELOPMENT PEACEBUILDING NEXUS: FROM GOOD INTENTIONS TO ACTIONS

Institutional lead: European Centre for Development Policy Management

Description: Calls for greater collaboration between the humanitarian, development and peacebuilding sectors are getting louder. This session discusses the reasons why some aspects of this ‘nexus approach’ work while others face resistance, taking as its point of departure insights from new research conducted by the European Centre for Development Policy Management (ECDPM) on the nexus approach to humanitarian aid, peacebuilding and development cooperation in Somalia.

 

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TWO SIDES OF THE SAME COIN? ACHIEVING PEACE AND STABILITY THROUGH BETTER COLLABORATION BETWEEN MILITARY AND SECURITY ACTORS AND PEACEBUILDERS

Institutional lead: Interpeace

Description: The world is at its most violent for 30 years. Political upheaval, the emergence of new powers and instability linked to increased violence provide incentives for serious reflection and a search for new ways of working, especially in terms of how to prevent conflicts from erupting or reoccurring. The session will use the case study of Afghanistan to explore how similar mistakes can be avoided in the Sahel region, a space crowded with military, security and peacebuilding actors.

 

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SECURITY IMPLICATIONS OF MEGATRENDS IN AFRICA

Institutional lead: Africa Center for Strategic Studies

Description: This session examines how these megatrends will interact with evolving security conditions in the coming decades, and how to identify appropriate policy and institutional responses. Panellists will review the exogenous and endogenous forces shaping the future of African security and consider a range of alternative potential scenarios.

 

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INCLUSIVITY: THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT

Institutional lead: Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation

Description: The session explores how interventions that seek to achieve immediate stabilization can promote inclusivity and contribute to long-term efforts to build inclusive and sustainable peace and development, including implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the United Nations Security Council Resolutions on Sustaining Peace, as well as Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security and Resolution 2250 on Youth Peace and Security.

 

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FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION IN CONFLICT–AFFECTED STATES: CRISIS RESPONSE, BUILDING RESILIENCE AND IMPROVING THE PROSPECTS FOR SUSTAINABLE PEACE

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This panel brings together the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Food Programme with peacebuilding and civil society actors to discuss challenges, share successes and failures, and identify lessons that bridge short-term emergency support and longer-term resilience and development interventions while supporting local peace and stability.

 

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FROM GLOBAL TO LOCAL: HOW CAN WE PRACTICALLY APPLY GLOBAL PEACEBUILDING FRAMEWORKS?

Institutional lead: Alliance for Peacebuilding

Description: The United Nations Secretary-General's agenda on Sustaining Peace and the United Nations/World Bank report Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict are global policy frameworks that boldly push for fundamental change in the way conflict and violence are addressed and how peace is built. This session considers how these frameworks can proactively shape national policies and be implemented locally.

 

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15 May 15.00–17.00

 

SUSTAINING PEACE IN PRACTICE: REFLECTIONS FROM IMPLEMENTATION AT COUNTRY LEVEL

Institutional lead: Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation; Global Partnership for the Prevention of Armed Conflict; International Peace Institute

Description: In this session, speakers will share the findings of country level research on how the United Nations Security Council resolutions on sustaining peace and on peacebuilding are being operationalized, explore the innovations taking place and the remaining challenges, and stimulate participants to examine these findings and experiences more broadly. The session seeks to enhance understanding of ongoing efforts to strengthen the UN's work on peacebuilding and sustaining peace in practical terms and to look more closely at what is required to deepen operational coherence, partnerships and inclusivity.   

 

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LEVERAGING CRISIS POINTS TO CATALYZE LONG–TERM SOCIAL CHANGE

Institutional lead: Institute for Integrated Transitions; World Bank

Description: By exploring why individuals and groups resist change, and how to leverage moments of crisis to launch and sustain a system-level change process, this session will empower participants to be more effective agents of sustainable change in their respective environments. A number of participants will have the opportunity to analyse the systemic challenges they are facing using the Adaptive Leadership framework. 

 

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LINKING SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT THROUGH GOOD GOVERNANCE OF  SDG 16

Institutional lead: The Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance

Description: The United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development acknowledges the central role of effective, accountable and transparent institutions in contributing to peace, justice and violence prevention in the context of sustainable development. National security sectors that are both effective and accountable in a framework where democratic control, the rule of law and respect for human rights are a core element of achieving the good governance ambitions of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 and its related targets (Agenda 16+), the SDG most closely associated with the peacebuilding agenda.

 

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NO ROOM FOR MARGINALIZATION: AN INTERSECTIONAL APPROACH TO GENDER-SENSITIVE PEACE PROCESSES

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: With the aim of filling this policy gap and advancing a more inclusive WPS agenda, this session seeks to increase understanding of intersectional approaches to gender-sensitive peace processes, focused primarily on women and men from marginalized groups as well as other gender identity groups, and devise strategies for their inclusion in WPS discussions.

 

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REVISITING POST–CONFLICT STABILISATION AND EARLY RECOVERY: INSIGHTS FROM FIELD OPERATIONS

Institutional lead: European Union Institute for Security Studies

Description: In this session, practitioners from the security, development and humanitarian communities will discuss the lessons from and prospects for post-conflict stabilization in Mali and Somalia—two states confronted by the threat of terrorism and violent extremism and at the heart of the international community’s efforts to support stability. The panel will look specifically at the challenges of coordination on the ground, such as the sequencing of interventions and the intersection of mandates between actors, as well as the strategy to ensure a transition from stabilization to long-term peacebuilding goals.

 

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COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVES ON MILITARY SUPPORT TO RULING PARTIES

Institutional lead: Institute for Integrated Transitions

Description: This session examines a number of current cases in which the interaction between party hegemony and military control has provided strong political protection against attempts by social or opposition movements to precipitate greater democracy, even when the regime has lost its initial electoral appeal or its international legitimacy. Comparing cases can provide a more precise understanding of this specific dynamic and explain how the role of a professional military can change from safeguarding peace and national sovereignty to one in which the armed forces control and manage key industries (legally or illegally) in a country.

 

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THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF HUMANITARIAN AID AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PEACE MEDIATION: THE CASE OF SOUTH SUDAN

Institutional lead: United States Institute of Peace

Description: This session explores the interaction between humanitarian operations and mediation efforts in South Sudan and the impact of aid on the political economy of conflict.

 

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LANCET–SIGHT COMMISSION: ADVANCING EVIDENCE AND ACTION ON THE INTERLINKAGES BETWEEN HEALTH, GENDER EQUALITY, PEACE, JUSTICE AND STRONG INSTITUTIONS

Institutional lead: Swedish Institute for  Global Health Transformation

Description: This session is a dialogue to inform the agenda of a newly launched Lancet Commission, hosted by the Swedish Institute for Global Health Transformation (SIGHT), on the interlinkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on good health and well-being (SDG 3), gender equality (SDG 5), and peace, justice and strong institutions (SDG 16).

 

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16 May 9.00–11.00

MEASURING ILLICIT ARMS FLOWS: KEY CHALLENGES FOR  SDG GOAL 16.4 AND INDICATOR 16.4.2

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: In advance of the High-level Political Forum in New York in July, where the indicators and data collection efforts associated with SDG 16 will be discussed, this session will review the work being done to measure illicit arms flows and achieve target 16.4. This will include a discussion of the challenges associated with data collection in these areas and an attempt to identify where lessons can be learned from and progress made on developing meaningful indicators and generating reliable data.

 

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SHORT–TERM, LONG–SIGHTED: HOW CRISIS MANAGEMENT AND HUMANITARIAN AID CAN EMPOWER LOCAL RECONCILERS

Institutional lead: The Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers; Mercy Corps; Crisis Management Centre Finland

Description: National and international actors in conflict areas are often guided by the short-term timeframes of the media, politicians and donors. This risks harming the locally led work of reconcilers and peacemakers, which is often framed by religious or traditional values. The panel will also explore how international organizations can identify legitimate and effective local reconcilers and peacemakers, how to ensure alignment of interests across local and international actors and how to plan inclusive humanitarian assistance that supports locally led peacebuilding. 

 

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WHAT IS LEGITIMATE STABILITY? DIFFERENCES BETWEEN LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL PERCEPTIONS

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This session explores the stabilization interventions of external actors, such as international NGOs and peace operations, to strengthen the provision of security and justice in order to contribute to legitimate stability. It looks at how such interventions influence renegotiation of the social contract between local authorities, and other non-state actors and the local population, and affect inclusiveness and representativeness.

 

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CULTURE EATS STRATEGY FOR BREAKFAST: USING BEHAVIORAL INSIGHTS TO REIMAGINE AGENCY AND INCLUSION

Institutional lead: Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium

Description: How can behavioural research on conflict-affected situations help de-fragment current policy developments? International interpretations of stabilization and prevention are changing, and there is a shaky consensus on which institutional arrangements to promote in fragile states. This fragmentation feeds the trend for locally owned solutions to trump internationally supported institutional approaches. For this trend to be meaningful, however, individuals need to experience their own agency and inclusion.

 

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OPERATIONALIZING SDG 16 AND THE TRIPLE NEXUS: EXPLORING LESSONS FROM CURRENT PEACEBUILDING PRACTICE IN CONFLICT–AFFECTED CONTEXTS

Institutional lead: International Rescue Committee

Description: This session will be a problem-solving deep dive into exploring practical examples of the operationalization of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 and the Humanitarian/Peacebuilding/ Development triple nexus.

 

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NEGOTIATING THE STABILITY OF POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE MAGHREB REGION: POWER, LAW AND REFORM

Institutional lead: Laboratoire de recherche en droit international et européen et relations Maghreb–Europe

Description: The interest in studying the Maghreb region stems from its appearance of cultural and historical unity, on the one hand, and the diversity of its political and institutional landscape, on the other. Each state in the region is undergoing a particular moment of transition, be it in continuity with established systems or a complete rupture with the conventional power balance.

 

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TIMING AND SEQUENCING OF POST–WAR ELECTIONS: ‘MAKE HASTE SLOWLY’

Institutional lead: International IDEA

Description: It is common practice for peace agreements to include provisions on the organization of democratic elections. However, decisions on when elections should take place and how to sequence them against other peacebuilding processes are often controversial. If organized soon after the end of violent conflict, elections organizers must confront the lack or weakness of democratic institutions, security challenges and unresolved grievances.

 

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16 May 11.30–13.30

IT TAKES DIALOGUE: PROMOTING SUSTAINING PEACE

Institutional lead: Dag Hammarskjöld Foundation

Description: This session seeks to stimulate discussion and learning on the relationship between mediation efforts to resolve violent conflict and reach peace agreements, and the broader, longer term dialogue processes needed to implement these agreements and to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies. Particular focus will be placed on the role and potential of these types of interventions in advancing the United Nations agenda on Sustaining Peace. The discussion will be contextualized with examples from Israel/Palestine, Pakistan, Somalia and Sweden.

 

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CHINA’S RISING ROLE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND PEACEBUILDING CONTEXTS

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This session explores China’s growing economic and political footprint in fragile and developing country contexts, including in but not limited to situations of protracted conflict. Since the early 2000s, China has become an increasingly significant development actor and source of foreign direct investment, operating alongside and in parallel with traditional donors and institutions associated with the global North.

 

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STAKEHOLDERS AND LOCAL REALITIES: 360 DEGREES ON SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE SAHEL

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: This small, in-depth workshop brings together decision makers, academics and knowledge brokers from the global North and the global South to explore emerging synergies in response to growing insecurity in the Sahel. The discussion will seek to address the structural limitations of current approaches and enrich perspectives for collaborative peacebuilding in the region. Building on the forum’s theme, the session will attempt to challenge conventional wisdom across all development sectors and explore the duality of urgent or rapid responses and long-term mechanisms vital for attaining sustainable peace.

 

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THE ROLE OF LEGITIMACY IN TRANSITIONS FROM FRAGILITY TO RESILIENCE

Institutional lead: United States Institute of Peace

Description: Following publication of the final report of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Task Force on Extremism in Fragile States earlier this year, and building on the recent findings of the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium, this session offers an opportunity for participants to engage in a discussion on the role of legitimacy in consolidating transitions from fragility to resilience. The discussion will be moderated by USIP around a set of key questions: What do we know about how state legitimacy is constructed? How do state-provided services feature in the process of building political legitimacy? What are the policy and programme implications? 

 

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COLOMBIA: FROM THE BRINK TO SECURITY EXPORTER

Institutional lead: PRISM at National Defense University

Description: This session explores how the evolving vision of Plan Colombia helped Colombia step back from the brink of state failure to navigate a path to its current level of stability in an increasingly unstable region. How has Plan Colombia served to get Colombia this far? How will success be defined and how will it lead to a sustainable peace? Who owns Plan Colombia and how has this changed over time? To what extent is Colombia exporting peace and security to the rest of the region? Should it be trying? The second half of the discussion will explore how the Plan Colombia process might be a useful learning experience in other contexts.

 

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WHAT ROLE FOR SECURITY SECTOR REFORM IN PEACE PROCESSES?

Institutional lead: The Geneva Centre for Security Sector Governance

Description: Security Sector Reform (SSR) seeks to improve state and human security by ensuring that the provision, management and oversight of security are anchored within a framework of democratic governance, respect for the rule of law and human rights. Based on the results of a DCAF research project—which was finalized in the first quarter of 2019 and seeks to bridge the gap between the mediation and SSR communities—this session explores how provisions on SSR and related activities emerge from peace processes, and the role of SSR and related activities in war-to-peace transitions. 

 

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16 May 15.00–17.00

CLIMATE CHANGE, PEACEBUILDING AND SUSTAINING PEACE

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: Building peace is rarely if ever straightforward. Peacebuilding becomes exponentially more difficult in countries affected by climate change because the compounded consequences of climate change and violent conflict exacerbate the human costs of war long after active combat has ceased. The session will attempt to formulate lessons learned so that multilateral peacebuilding efforts can better respond to the compounded risks of conflict and climate change.

 

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THE ROLE OF SECURITY ACTORS IN PROTECTING CIVILIANS

Institutional lead: Center for Civilians in Conflict

Description: The session focuses on the importance of the protection of civilians in conflict resolution efforts and the need to involve security actors in the protection of civilians. There is ample research to show that one of the primary reasons why young men across the world join armed non-state actors is violence against their families and communities. The Center for Civilians in Conflict (CIVIC) with others have been working for many years to change the mindset of military actors by making legal, ethical and strategic arguments for better protection of civilians and providing concrete tools for enhancing protection.

 

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INNOVATIVE APPROACHES TO OVERCOME SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGES IN THE SAHEL REGION

Institutional lead: World Bank

Description: Increasing violence, conflict and insecurity­—such as the instability in Mali and the escalation of violence by Boko Haram in the Lake Chad region—have displaced more than 4.5 million people and dramatically increased food insecurity across the Sahel. This session, organized by the World Bank, will discuss the underlying causes of violence in the region and innovative approaches to overcoming fragility and development challenges.

 

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EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND PEACE INNOVATION

Institutional lead: SaferGlobe

Description: Emerging technologies and the development of peacetech create possibilities for ensuring the sustainability  of peace processes. This session will focus on the role of technologies in bridging gaps in current knowledge and the potential for innovation in peace operations through practical examples of peacetech.

 

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POLICING IN STABILIZATION ENVIRONMENTS

Institutional lead: Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Description: Peace operations are increasingly being deployed to unstable countries and countries where there is little or no peace to keep.  What are the practical challenges for protecting civilians and establishing public security and the rule of law in unstable environments? The session will be an in-depth discussion on the challenges for policing in conflict-affected ‘stabilization contexts’. 

 

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TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE AND THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

Institutional lead: International Center for Transitional Justice

Description: The legacies of serious and massive human rights violations—from a widespread sense of grievance, to exclusion, lack of trust, social division, and compromised and weak institutions, as well as the massive numbers of victims and/or their dependents—create specific challenges for making progress towards sustainable development. Using the notion of prevention as a lens for considering such contributions, the discussion will cover the need for transitional justice to be innovative and context-specific, the role of transitional justice in balancing short-term stability and long-term change, the importance of the participation of victims and civil society, and the role of the international community in supporting transitional justice that contributes to sustainable development.

 

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