The independent resource on global security

Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman

POSITION AT SIPRI
Senior Researcher

Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman

Sam Perlo-Freeman

Dr Sam Perlo-Freeman is a Senior researcher and Head of the SIPRI Project on Military Expenditure in the Arms and Military Expenditure Programme. He is responsible for monitoring data on military expenditure worldwide. Previously he was a Senior Lecturer at the University of the West of England, working in the field of defence and peace economics. 

Subject expertise

Military expenditure issues and methodology; arms production issues and methodology; economics of military expenditure; economics of arms trade; arms trade corruption.

Regional expertise

Europe, Israel, Palestine

Phone number
+46 766 286 176
Languages
English, French, Swedish
Education

PhD in Economics, University of the West of England. PhD In Mathematics, University of Warwick.

Citizenship
United Kingdom
United States
Affiliations
  • Economists for Peace and Security, Member
  • Economics of Peace and Security, Editorial Board Member
SIPRI PUBLICATIONS
External publications
  • Perlo-Freeman, S. 'Military expenditure and the global culture of militarism', Chapter 11 in Kassimeris, C. & Gouliamos, K. (Eds), The marketing of war in the age of neo-militarism, London: Routledge, 2012.
  • Perlo-Freeman, S and Brauner, J, 'Natural resources and military expenditure: the case of Algeria', Economics of Peace and Security Journal, vol. 7, no. 1 (2012).
  • Perlo-Freeman, S., ‘The UK arms industry in a globalised world’, in A. Tan (Edt), The Global Arms Trade: A Handbook, London: Routledge, 2010.
  • Perlo-Freeman, S. and Webber, D., ‘Basic needs, government debt and economic growth’, The World Economy, vol. 32, no. 6 (June 2009).
  • Perlo-Freeman, S. et al., ‘Military expenditure’, SIPRI Yearbook 2009 (Oxford University Press, 2009).
  • Perlo-Freeman, S., ‘Arms production’, SIPRI Yearbook 2009.
  • Dunne, P., Perlo-Freeman, S. and Smith, R., ‘The demand for military expenditure in developing countries: hostility versus capability’, Defence & Peace Economics, vol. 19, no. 4 (Aug. 2008).