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SIPRI awarded Carnegie grant for work on emerging threats in nuclear security

Specialists conduct hazardous-response platoon training at the Satsop nuclear power plant development in Elma, Washington, USA in August 2017.
Specialists conduct hazardous-response platoon training at the Satsop nuclear power plant development in Elma, Washington, USA in August 2017. Photo: US Army/Sgt. Mark Miranda

Carnegie Corporation of New York has awarded SIPRI researchers one of its eight grants for addressing emerging threats in nuclear security.

Dr Vincent Boulanin and Dr Lora Saalman will lead a project to map the impact of machine learning and autonomy on strategic stability and nuclear risk. This innovative and timely research will investigate to what extent these capabilities are elements of the future military modernization plans of the nine nuclear-armed states. In doing so, they hope to illuminate how related developments may be stabilizing or destabilizing to international security.

‘Machine learning and autonomy are capabilities that cut across a range of existing and planned weapons platforms. By focusing on them, we hope that the project will demystify important dimensions of the world of emerging technologies’, says Dr Vincent Boulanin, Researcher on Emerging Technologies at SIPRI. ‘Given the conventional and nuclear crossover of these capabilities, it is imperative to gain a better understanding of their current technological status and potential impact on strategic stability among all nuclear-armed states’, added Dr  Lora Saalman, Director of SIPRI's China and Global Security Programme.

Read more about the award on the Carnegie Corporation of New York website here.

About Carnegie Corporation of New York

Carnegie Corporation of New York was established in 1911 by Andrew Carnegie to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding. In keeping with this mandate, the Corporation's work focuses on the issues that Andrew Carnegie considered of paramount importance: international peace, the advancement of education and knowledge, and a strong democracy. More information is available at www.carnegie.org.