Economists on Conflict

The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 1)

The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 1)

Posted by Editor at Mar 30, 2015 09:00 AM |
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(Authors: Scott Gates, Håvard Hegre, Håvard Mokleiv Nygård and Håvard Strand) War is a development issue. War kills, and its consequences extend far beyond deaths in battle. Armed conflict often leads to forced migration, long-term refugee problems, and the destruction of infrastructure. Social, political, and economic institutions can be permanently damaged. The consequences of war, especially civil war, for development are profound. In this two-part post, we examine the development consequences of internal armed conflict. Part 1 focuses on how conflict affects development. Part 2 turns to the conflict trap and the post-2015 development agenda.

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Money changes everything? Poverty and deprivation in Northern Ireland

Money changes everything? Poverty and deprivation in Northern Ireland

Posted by admin at Mar 11, 2015 11:55 AM |
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(Author: Neil T. N. Ferguson and Maren M. Michelsen) To think that deprivation and poverty are one and the same is, arguably, a limit of the imagination on the part of those for whom hardship is an abstract concept, rather than a day-to-day reality. Along with a lack of alternative data sources, this lack of imagination has permeated a long line of research linking deprivation, via poverty, to adverse life outcomes. Our research on Northern Ireland seeks to isolate the causal impacts of deprivation, with a view to informing future government policies aiming at minimizing its effects.

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The misfortune of visibility in violent conflicts

The misfortune of visibility in violent conflicts

Posted by Editor at Feb 23, 2015 09:00 AM |
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(Authors: Damir Esenaliev and Susan Steiner) Economic disparities between ethnic groups are often seen as a driver of ethnic conflict. Understanding the extent of these disparities, and their sources, can help inform policies that aim to avoid further conflict. However, our research on economic disparities between Kyrgyz and Uzbek households in southern Kyrgyzstan suggests that the reality is far more complex.

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‘Order at sea’ and landlocked countries in Africa

‘Order at sea’ and landlocked countries in Africa

Posted by Editor at Feb 02, 2015 12:00 PM |
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(Author: J. Paul Dunne) Things have been changing on the east coast of Africa. The number of maritime pirate attacks has been massively reduced and commentators are talking about ‘order at sea’ in the region. This has led to clear benefits for maritime economies in the area, and these benefits are likely to be spread even further. In this context, improved order at sea could also be important for landlocked countries. As these countries tend to be somewhat poorer than their maritime neighbours, this is good news indeed.

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Debating the future of the German arms industry, again

Debating the future of the German arms industry, again

Posted by Editor at Nov 07, 2014 09:00 AM |
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(Author: Michael Brzoska) Germany is, once again, debating the future of its arms industry. While not very large—with around 90 000 employees, or less than two per cent of total employment in German industry—it has long had a privileged status. In particular, German procurement authorities continue to give preferential treatment to German production. This political favoritism has also extended to arms exports. However, these two pillars of state support for arms production in Germany now appear to be crumbling.

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About this Blog

Economists on Conflict is a group blog discussing issues that are pressing and relevant to the policy, practice and theory of economics and development in conflict and crisis-affected contexts.

Co-hosted by SIPRI and Economists for Peace and Security (EPS), this blog aims to promote global discussion and shared learning on economic aspects of peace and security.

The first 20 posts in this blog series were published in cooperation with the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) through its International Network on Economics and Conflict (INEC).

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Economists for Peace and Security (EPS), formerly ECAAR, provides expertise for policy issues and information for social scientists, citizens, journalists and policy-makers worldwide.

On the EPS website you can find news related to peace and security issues, links to datasets, research and other publications.