Economists on Conflict

BRICS: realistic alternative with a stuttering motor

Posted by admin at Jun 11, 2015 12:10 PM |
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(Author: Herbert Wulf) BRICS has recently lost some of its previous dynamic. This is partly due to reduced economic growth, compared to the previous phenomenal growth rates. In the case of Russia it looks like a dramatic economic crisis in 2014/2015; the other four BRICS members are experiencing slower growth. It seems their economic motor is stuttering.

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Do government transfers reduce civil unrest?

Posted by Editor at May 18, 2015 12:00 AM |
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(Author: Patricia Justino) The past few years have seen an increase in civil unrest across the globe, from food riots to the Arab Spring and the Occupy movement in the United States and other countries. These events have been linked to rises in economic and social inequalities and social exclusion, which have resulted in the accumulation of social discontent.

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Once the conflict ends: what drives the return of internally displaced people?

Once the conflict ends: what drives the return of internally displaced people?

Posted by Editor at Apr 27, 2015 09:00 AM |
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Author: Ana María Ibáñez) The end of a conflict poses new challenges. The post-conflict period can be fragile: political forces need to accommodate to the new realities, a flow of ex-combatants re-enters society, victims become active political actors claiming truth and restitution, and uncertainty remains high. More specifically, the return of internally displaced persons (IDPs) is a serious challenge in post-conflict situations. What happens to these people when the conflict ends?

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The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 2)

The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 2)

Posted by Editor at Apr 06, 2015 09:00 AM |
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(Authors: Scott Gates, Håvard Hegre, Håvard Mokleiv Nygård and Håvard Strand) War is a development issue. War kills, and its consequences extend far beyond deaths in battle. Armed conflict often leads to forced migration, long-term refugee problems, and the destruction of infrastructure. Social, political, and economic institutions can be permanently damaged. The consequences of war, especially civil war, for development are profound. In this two-part post, we examine the development consequences of internal armed conflict. Part 1 focuses on how conflict affects development. Part 2 turns to the conflict trap and the post-2015 development agenda.

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The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 1)

The consequences of internal armed conflict for development (part 1)

Posted by Editor at Mar 30, 2015 09:00 AM |
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(Authors: Scott Gates, Håvard Hegre, Håvard Mokleiv Nygård and Håvard Strand) War is a development issue. War kills, and its consequences extend far beyond deaths in battle. Armed conflict often leads to forced migration, long-term refugee problems, and the destruction of infrastructure. Social, political, and economic institutions can be permanently damaged. The consequences of war, especially civil war, for development are profound. In this two-part post, we examine the development consequences of internal armed conflict. Part 1 focuses on how conflict affects development. Part 2 turns to the conflict trap and the post-2015 development agenda.

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About this Blog

Economists on Conflict is a group blog discussing issues that are pressing and relevant to the policy, practice and theory of economics and development in conflict and crisis-affected contexts.

Co-hosted by SIPRI and Economists for Peace and Security (EPS), this blog aims to promote global discussion and shared learning on economic aspects of peace and security.

The first 20 posts in this blog series were published in cooperation with the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) through its International Network on Economics and Conflict (INEC).

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Economists for Peace and Security (EPS), formerly ECAAR, provides expertise for policy issues and information for social scientists, citizens, journalists and policy-makers worldwide.

On the EPS website you can find news related to peace and security issues, links to datasets, research and other publications.