Military Expenditure

The SIPRI military expenditure project was established in 1967 to study developments in world military expenditure. Military expenditure is an indicator of the economic resources devoted to military purposes. The project monitors and analyses trends in military expenditure over time, looking at their economic, political and security drivers and their implications for global peace, security and development.

SIPRI MILEX DATA LAUNCH 2015

The SIPRI Military Expenditure Database, containing data from 1988 to the most recent full calendar year (2014), has been updated. Read more about recent trends in world military expenditure here.

 

RECENT MEDIA COVERAGE


'Gigantisk parad ska visa Kinas militära muskler’, (Gigantic parade to show China's military muscle), SVT, 3 September 2015
These charts show the immensity of the US' defense budget’, Business Insider, 31 August 2015
Are $1.5 Billion in Lockheed Martin's Patriot Missiles Headed to the Middle East?’, Baltimore citybizlist, 8 August 2015
Greek Crisis Awaits Other NATO Partners’, Before It’s News, 1 July 2015
Sino-Indian relations today: Some basic issues’, Business Standard, 24 June 2015
'The majority of NATO member states still aren't pulling their weight on defense spending', Business Insider, 24 June 2015
'Report: 'China's Strategic Assertiveness' Fueling Tensions in Asia', The Diplomat, 16 June 2015


See more SIPRI in the media here.

Database
The SIPRI database on military expenditure covers 171 countries and contains consistent data for the period since 1988. Data for the most recent 10-year period are published in the SIPRI Yearbook. Data from 1988 is available in the SIPRI military expenditure database on-line. SIPRI provides the only long-term, historically consistent series of military expenditure data with global coverage available. SIPRI military expenditure data are based on a variety of open sources which are processed to achieve consistent time series and are as far as possible in accordance with the SIPRI definition of military expenditure. See also Sources and methods for SIPRI data on military expenditure.
World military expenditure in 2014 was an estimated $1776 billion. The total was equivalent to 2.3 per cent of world GDP. Total spending fell by 0.4 per cent in real terms between 2013 and 2014, the third consecutive year of falling global spending. Military spending fell in North America, Western and Central Europe, and Latin America & the Caribbean, but increased in Asia and Oceania, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Africa. China , Russia and Saudi Arabia all continued to make substantial increases in military expenditure. Saudi Arabia's 17 per cent increase was the highest of any country in the top 15 military spenders in 2014. Read more about recent trends in military expenditure for 2014 here.

Monitoring
What is military expenditure, and why should we be interested in measuring it? How easy is it to obtain reliable information on military expenditure, and what are the problems involved in producing data that are consistent over time and comparable across countries?The SIPRI military expenditure project was initiated in 1967 to study developments in world military expenditure. The current SIPRI database on military expenditure covers 171 countries and contains consistent data for the period since 1988. Data for the most recent 10-year period are published annually in the SIPRI Yearbook. Data from 1988 is available in the SIPRI military expenditure database on-line. SIPRI provides the only long-term, historically consistent series of military expenditure data with global coverage available today. Read more...
Questions of 'national security' are a sensitive issue for all countries, and are often the subject of considerable secrecy. Most countries provide at least some information about their military expenditure, but this may often lack detail or omit significant items of extra-budgetary or off-budget expenditure. A broader issue is that of military budget processes: who has an input into setting the military budget, and what is the policy basis for it? What role, if any, is there for parliament and civil society? And is the actual spending subject to independent monitoring and auditing? Where transparency and accountability are lacking in military spending and budgeting, this can lead to uncertainty amongst neighbouring countries, prevent citizens from getting a proper picture of how public funds are being spent, and can open the door to corruption. Read more...

STAFF

 

SIPRI’s International Arms Transfers, Arms Production and Military Expenditure projects are now combined into one programme, the SIPRI Arms and Military Expenditure Programme.  

Need more information on SIPRI military spending data? Before consulting our team, the answer you're looking for may be here, in our database, our latest fact sheet, or our frequently asked questions.

SIPRI DATABASE ON MILITARY EXPENDITURE

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Frequently Asked Questions

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