Appendix 4A. Military expenditure data, 2001–10

SAM PERLO-FREEMAN, OLAWALE ISMAIL, NOEL KELLY, ELISABETH SKÖNS AND CARINA SOLMIRANO

Appendix 4A contains tables of military expenditure by region, country and income group, in local currency and constant dollars, and as a share of GDP for the period 2001–10.

Summary

Military expenditure in 2010 increased by 1.3 per cent in real terms to reach $1630 billion. The slower rate of increase compared to previous years is partly due to the delayed effects of the global economic crisis.

Military spending grew most rapidly in South America (5.8 per cent), Africa (5.2 per cent) and Oceania (4.1 per cent). Across Asia and Oceania the increase was only 1.4 per cent, one of the lowest rates in recent years, while military spending fell in Europe, by 2.8 per cent.

Military expenditure, by region, 2010

Region
Spending
($ b.)
Africa 30.1
  North Africa 10.6
  Sub-Saharan Africa
19.5
Americas 791  
  Central America and the Caribbean 6.5
  North America 721  
  South America 63.3
Asia and Oceania 317  
  Central and South Asia 51.2
  East Asia 211  
  Oceania 25.7
  South East Asia 28.7
Europe 382  
  Eastern 65.5
  Western and Central 316  
Middle East 111  
World total
1630  

The spending figures are in current (2010) US dollars.

The top 10 military spenders, 2010

Rank

Country
Spending
($ b.)
World
share (%)
  1 USA 698    
43
  2 China [119] [7.3]
  3 UK 59.6 
3.7
  4 France 59.3 
3.6
  5 Russia [58.7] [3.6]
  6 Japan 54.5 
3.3
  7 Saudi Arabia 45.2 
2.8
  8 Germany [45.2] 
[2.8]
  9 India
41.3 
2.5
10 Italy [37.0] 
[2.3]
  World total
1630    
 

[ ] = SIPRI estimate. The spending figures are in current (2010) US dollars.

The 10 largest military spenders in 2010 accounted for 75 per cent of world military spending. The USA alone accounted for 43 per cent, far more than China in second place.

The share of their GDPs that the major spenders devoted to military spending (the military burden) varied considerably, from just 1.0 per cent in the case of Japan to 10.4 per cent for Saudi Arabia. However, only 3 of the top 10 spenders—Russia, Saudi Arabia and the USA—have military burdens above the global average of 2.6 per cent.

 

 

This data is obtained from the SIPRI Military Expenditure Database.